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sunday post: po-faced

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1. His shrink warned him once: in almost every case, the net result of perfectionism is not the creation of perfect things but rather mediocrity. One can’t quite face the work or the release of the work, the work becomes literally unbearable, thought drifts toward the meta-consideration of why the work isn’t right rather than what the work actually needs to be, one tries too hard or gives up and tries not hard enough. Whatever – the net result is generally the same.

2. He thinks about the deep compatibility of the internet with such attitudes and patterns of behavior. He thinks of the way it services a need to work that cannot face the work itself. He thinks of the outlet that a blog provides for the logorrhea that does indeed require outlet, but only ever in a space of effort without consequence, no possibility of reward or the failure to attain a reward.

3. They are sitting outside Medcalf in Exmouth Market.


Brooklyn-vibe, sunny. The hipsters are the next table who kept asking them for a light have given up on asking, just come and wordlessly do their business with the lighter on the table and then return to their own places.

A pause, and then the conversation resumes.

The agent says: “I would, if I were you, try to make it funny.”

“Funny, yes. Well, it’s not not funny. It’s funny, in a dry sort of way. I think it’s funny.”

“You just wouldn’t want to be po-faced about it. Given the subject matter, given what it’s about.”

From the bar across the pedestrianized street, a roar of expectation and then a roar of disappointment. South Africa v. Mexico. He puts his hand on his bag in the seat beside him. Expensive ultralight laptop, Macbook Air.

He says to the agent, “I suppose I know what you mean. But if it is funny, it is funny in the way that Coetzee’s Disgrace is funny.”

Disgrace doesn’t strike me as a particularly funny novel.”

“No, actually I can name at least three, no four, no five funny things in it. The bit about the prostitute in the beginning, what does he say, ‘a moderate, moderated bliss….’ Funny.”

“Right, OK….”

“The bit about Emma Bovary, Lurie’s fantasy of Emma Bovary coming out with him in Cape Town.”

“…”

“And of course the ending, the three-legged dog.”

“I guess that’s funny. I don’t know, maybe I’d call it…”

“The three-legged dog! Listen do you want another drink? I want another one. What is that, what sort of white?”

“House.”

Minutes pass. South Africa  – Mexico has come to an end, a draw. And the he returns, drinks in hands.

4. Later that night, he is drunk and discusses the matter in depth, sort of, with his wife.

5. The next morning, he checks his Current Fictional Projects for signs of humor. He is not sure. But when is he ever funny? When do people laugh at him? His students laugh, and people laugh at his lectures. But he decides that he is funniest when, in the murky confidence of a pub or a party, he is vicious about other people, says the worst things in the world about a mutual acquaintance. A Catholic school skill, a survival technique for smart kids, lexically inclined – you caption the weak lest ye be captioned yourself and become, then, the weak. Could he do this in fiction? Construct devastating little à clefs about people that he knows in the real world?

6. Later that morning, while the kids are still asleep, he sifts the piles of unsorted, unopened mail, a week’s worth, on his kitchen table. Ah! The New Yorker‘s “20 under 40” fiction issue. Just the thing to cheer him up! He puts it aside.


He spends the rest of the morning writing emails to invoice magazines and get back to publicity editors and responses to his pitches, which makes him feel slightly better but not in a lasting way. He writes n+1 to tell them that one of his pieces seems to have disappeared from the new website.

A bit better but not much better. It doesn’t last.

7. He has the thought that if he simply could stop thinking about writing and simply do more of it… Well, sure…

8. He can only remember one occasion when he laughed aloud a something in a piece of fiction. Surely there were other times, but if there were he can’t remember them now. It was a scene in the middle of Jean-Philippe Toussaint’s Television when the protagonist / narrator is futzing away some grant-funded time in Berlin, during which he’s supposed to write an academic book. Futzing around, he comes to a large park in which it’s permissible to sunbathe in the nude, even if no one’s actually doing it where he is at the moment in question. He decides to take off all of his clothes anyway, and is walking along in the nude when he happens to run into the members of the board who offered him the grant. He ends up having a conversation with his bosses / benefactors, middle of the day and CABNM (clothed academic board naked male to put it into a porn category that doesn’t exist but perhaps should) about the progress of his work and the like.

It made him laugh, anyway. Who knows…

9. On the toilet in the early afternoon he finally opens the issue of The New Yorker and reads Rivka Galchen’s story “The Entire Northern Side Was Covered With Fire.” Here’s the beginning.

People say no one reads anymore, but I find that’s not the case. Prisoners read. I guess they’re not given much access to computers. A felicitous injustice for me. The nicest reader letters I’ve received—also the only reader letters I’ve received—have come from prisoners. Maybe we’re all prisoners? In our lives, our habits, our relationships? That’s not nice, my saying that. Maybe it’s even evil, to co-opt the misery of others.

I want to mention that, when I sold the movie, my husband had just left me. I came home one day and a bunch of stuff was gone. I thought we’d been robbed. Then I found a note: “I can’t live here anymore.” He had taken quite a lot with him. For example, we had a particularly nice Parmesan grater and he had taken that. But he had left behind his winter coat. Also a child. We had a child together, sort of. I was carrying it—girl or boy, I hadn’t wanted to find out—inside me.

I searched online for a replacement for that Parmesan grater, because I had really liked that Parmesan grater. It was the kind that works like a mill, not the kind you just scrape against; it had a handle that was fun to turn. There were a number of similar graters available, but with unappealing “comfort” grips. Finally, I found the same model. Was it premature to repurchase? Two days passed basically like that. Then, on Wednesday, my brother called. I gave him the update on my life.

Ah, now there it is! The Parmesan grater! Is that the funny that he is meant to do? The quirkily revelatory detail, the absurdity of everyday life, of kitchenware? Our essential triviality, our accoutrements, our tick-work preoccupations! And then rendered in voice, a voice that knows that it’s being listened to but still doesn’t get it – doesn’t hear quite what we hear… which is the funny! The author pretends to be the sort of person who says things for effect that doesn’t know they are saying things for effect. Fucking brilliant!

It made him laugh, anyway. Who knows…

10. At night, after the World Cup game, which his wife spends reading The New Yorker, she makes a joke about their ages, the fact that they still have time etc. He asks her, completely seriously, po-facedly even, how old he is – whether he is 33 or 34. He is sure it is the latter, but as it turns out he’s wrong. 33, still the interminable Jesus Year, a year in which he has laughed, he is sure, less than in any other year of his life.

Written by adswithoutproducts

June 12, 2010 at 11:57 pm

Posted in fiction, sunday

7 Responses

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  1. That last line was funniest.

    Wow, I had heard about this list but had not seen that illustration. What a gallery of smugness and preciousness, it’s the perfect equivalent of “the funny”. You can’t seriously aspire to join that kind of club.

    Gabe

    June 13, 2010 at 6:37 am

  2. Well let’s be clear – it’s not the folks’ fault who are on the list if the list seems a bit, well, whatever. The New Yorker is the problem, but it’d be insane to begrudge anyone participation in this sort of thing. And I like Galchen’s stuff in general! (For instance: http://tinyurl.com/crtn8r) It’s just the Parmesan grater was probably the wrong thing for me to run across yesterday in the midst of other preoccupations…

    adswithoutproducts

    June 13, 2010 at 10:09 am

  3. Isn’t #2 a rather old fashioned point of view — the sort of thing people who aren’t familiar with the medium say? I liked this writer’s description of blogging: http://sites.google.com/site/elizabethadamshome/interview

    Z

    June 13, 2010 at 7:18 pm

  4. I’m sure it is. It might nevertheless be true, in my case.

    adswithoutproducts

    June 13, 2010 at 8:29 pm

  5. I’m a bit puzzled about the most promising under 40’s list too, it’s not the first time you bring it up. It might have something to do with the fact that I’m eight months and six days short of being ineligible for it (if you don’t count ‘never having published any fiction’ as grounds for ineligibility) but shouldn’t one focus on being good, rather than in being good *and* young? There were also times in my life when I used to be thought of as being very precocious and I can say that that most double-edged of praises was of absolutely no help to me, on any level.

    Giovanni

    June 14, 2010 at 3:34 am

  6. Giovanni,

    I have a hilarious story about that word that I might well have told on here before but here goes:

    There was a weekly used books sale at the library in my home town when I was growing up which I used to frequent at the end of high school and the beginning of university. I bought absolute shitloads of books – like bags and bags at a time – because they didn’t cost very much at all – $25 say for three bags of moldering paperbacks etc. (I’ve always found comfort and safety in book having – parental house with no books sort of situation).

    Anyway, one time when I was having the bill tabulated for about 60 or so the library volunteer lady said to me: “My goodness, for such a young man so many books! You must be an amazing reader!” And I responded, beaming with pride, “Ah, yes, I suppose I am a bit pretentious for my age…”

    I meant, of course, precocious. But performative irony got the better of me, I suppose, because one can’t label oneself the one without being the latter.

    adswithoutproducts

    June 14, 2010 at 9:14 am

  7. I like to think I’m pretentious regardless of age.

    Giovanni

    June 14, 2010 at 9:19 am


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